FAQs

Q: 

Can Higgins Ink be Used for Tattoos?

A: We do not recommend using any of our Higgins inks for tattooing. We do not manufacture these inks to be used in the body and therefore we cannot guarantee that they are sterile or safe to use for tattooing; improper usage may result in infection or allergic reaction. We understand many tattoo enthusiasts recommend using our inks for DIY or Stick and Poke tattoos, however, we do not support that recommendation.

A: We do not recommend using any of our Higgins inks for tattooing. We do not manufacture these inks to be used in the body and therefore we cannot guarantee that they are sterile or safe to use for tattooing; improper usage may result in infection or allergic reaction. We understand many tattoo enthusiasts recommend using our inks for DIY or Stick and Poke tattoos, however, we do not support that recommendation.

Q: 

Can Higgins Inks Be Mixed?

A: Higgins inks can be mixed with one another to create new colors.  They can also be diluted with distilled water to create light washes and subtle tones.

A: We do not recommend using any of our Higgins inks for tattooing. We do not manufacture these inks to be used in the body and therefore we cannot guarantee that they are sterile or safe to use for tattooing; improper usage may result in infection or allergic reaction. We understand many tattoo enthusiasts recommend using our inks for DIY or Stick and Poke tattoos, however, we do not support that recommendation.

Q: 

Do Inks Expire?

A: Higgins inks last a long time.  However, various storage conditions may affect the properties of your ink.  Extreme temperature conditions and loosely closed caps may cause evaporation over time and change the characteristics of your ink.  Also, storing dye inks in bright light or exposing them to sunlight over long periods of time will cause the colors to shift, unlike pigmented inks which are more lightfast.  If your inks smells off, notice bacterial growth, or your color isn't as vibrant as it once was, it might be time to say good-bye to your old friend and get yourself a new bottle of ink.

A: We do not recommend using any of our Higgins inks for tattooing. We do not manufacture these inks to be used in the body and therefore we cannot guarantee that they are sterile or safe to use for tattooing; improper usage may result in infection or allergic reaction. We understand many tattoo enthusiasts recommend using our inks for DIY or Stick and Poke tattoos, however, we do not support that recommendation.

Q: 

Which Higgins Product is Vegan?

A: Higgins Pen Cleaner is a vegan product.

A: We do not recommend using any of our Higgins inks for tattooing. We do not manufacture these inks to be used in the body and therefore we cannot guarantee that they are sterile or safe to use for tattooing; improper usage may result in infection or allergic reaction. We understand many tattoo enthusiasts recommend using our inks for DIY or Stick and Poke tattoos, however, we do not support that recommendation.

Q: 

How are Ink and Watercolor Different?

A: It is true that ink and watercolor have a similar look on paper and both can be diluted with water.  However, the two media behave differently.  Most watercolor can be re-wet to lift off a surface or blended.  Ink, on the other hand, is usually permanent when it dries, and is not easily bendable after color is applied to paper. There are artists who choose to use both in mixed media projects, especially when they want to lay down color and not have it lift when applying layers of watercolor.  This is very useful when outlining with ink and filling in with watercolor. Ink is the choice when you don’t want the color to lift, and waterproof ink is the choice when you don’t want the color to bleed.  Lastly, if you are looking for fine detail, inks can be used in various types of pens, unlike watercolor. 

A: We do not recommend using any of our Higgins inks for tattooing. We do not manufacture these inks to be used in the body and therefore we cannot guarantee that they are sterile or safe to use for tattooing; improper usage may result in infection or allergic reaction. We understand many tattoo enthusiasts recommend using our inks for DIY or Stick and Poke tattoos, however, we do not support that recommendation.

Q: 

What's the Difference Between Pigment & Dye Inks?

A: A: The main difference is the colorant - pigments are usually made of natural materials that are ground down to a very fine powder and are suspended in a liquid ink base.  Minerals, carbon, and metals are all examples of materials that can be made into pigments. Synthetic pigments exist in a number of forms as well. Dyes, on the other hand, have a much smaller particle size and are soluble in the liquid ink base. Unlike pigments, they chemically bond to a surface like paper or cloth.  Dyes can be natural or synthetic. Synthetic dyes were first developed in 1856, while natural dyes go back much further in time. Natural dyes have been used for early inks and are derived from plants parts such as roots, berries, leaves, nuts, and so forth. The benefits to dye-based ink are that the materials are readily available and colors tend to be very vibrant. The drawback to dye inks — especially natural dye inks — is that they are not very lightfast. Today, you’d choose a pigmented ink for fine art applications because the ink is usually lightfast and the colors can be predictably blended with other pigmented inks. Dye-based inks are chosen for their vibrancy, not their longevity, so you may choose these inks for temporary applications, works that will be converted into a digital format,.

A: We do not recommend using any of our Higgins inks for tattooing. We do not manufacture these inks to be used in the body and therefore we cannot guarantee that they are sterile or safe to use for tattooing; improper usage may result in infection or allergic reaction. We understand many tattoo enthusiasts recommend using our inks for DIY or Stick and Poke tattoos, however, we do not support that recommendation.

Q: 

How are Ink and Watercolor Different?

A: It is true that ink and watercolor have a similar look on paper and both can be diluted with water.  However, the two media behave differently.  Most watercolor can be re-wet to lift off a surface or blended.  Ink, on the other hand, is usually permanent when it dries, and is not easily bendable after color is applied to paper. There are artists who choose to use both in mixed media projects, especially when they want to lay down color and not have it lift when applying layers of watercolor.  This is very useful when outlining with ink and filling in with watercolor. Ink is the choice when you don’t want the color to lift, and waterproof ink is the choice when you don’t want the color to bleed.  Lastly, if you are looking for fine detail, inks can be used in various types of pens, unlike watercolor. 

A: We do not recommend using any of our Higgins inks for tattooing. We do not manufacture these inks to be used in the body and therefore we cannot guarantee that they are sterile or safe to use for tattooing; improper usage may result in infection or allergic reaction. We understand many tattoo enthusiasts recommend using our inks for DIY or Stick and Poke tattoos, however, we do not support that recommendation.

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1 River Road, Leeds, MA 01053

Tel: 800-628-1910